Posts Tagged ‘secularization’

Book Review: Christianity in Contemporary China: Socio-cultural Perspectives edited by Francis Khek Gee

Review of Religion and Chinese SocietyI’ve written a review of Christianity in Contemporary China: Socio-cultural Perspectives (New York: Routledge, 2013. xiii + 265 pages. Hardcover. ISBN 978-0-415-52846-7) edited by Francis Khek Gee, professor of anthropology at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore for the journal Review of Religion and Chinese Society (宗教與社會, Volume 2, Issue 2). Christianity in Contemporary China represents one of the few currently available volumes examining the growth and development of Christianity in China via socio-cultural methodologies. Given the ascendancy of this religion in China, the study of Christianity in China will continue to draw scholars and researchers interested in the broad issue of religion in the region. This volume also provides new insight via social-cultural approaches to Christianity where existing studies of Christianity in China have been limited to historical methods. You can read the review of this edited volume by clicking on the link below.

Review of Christianity in Contemporary China: Socio-cultural Perspectives


Rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated

There’s an alarming story floating around the blogsphere for the past week about the death of evangelicalism. This story first originated on Michael Spencer’s blog and then was picked up by The Christian Science Monitor. Spencer’s predictions are dire and portentous. Simply put, evangelicalism, as we know it here in the West, is “on the verge… of a major collapse” and will cease to exist within 10 years. This doomsday prediction is partly based on the simple premise that evangelicals are slow to understand, exegete, and adapt to the changing social and cultural landscape and have failed to pass on the fundamentals of Christian faith and spirituality to the next generation. Added to this mix is the encroaching pressure of secularism, and evangelicalism, in Spencer’s view, will not survive such onslaught. In its place, Pentecostal, Catholic, and Orthodox churches will thrive, and Western evangelism would benefit to receive missions from Global South churches. [….]


Introducing Semaphoric

flagSo it begins: this blog was set to launch at the start of 2009 when procrastination took over the better of me. Although this first post dates back to January, it took some three months to get this project off the ground. I’m still putting this blog through its paces — there are a number of content and technical issues being worked out. Instead of having semaphoric launch in entire completeness, I’m planning to fill in the space as the blog progresses. For the most part, semaphoric is off and running.

What is semaphoric? From the Greek word sema for signs, semaphoric simply refers to semaphores, a system of visual signs designed to convey a message. Used primarily on ships and railroads, semaphore is the simplest way to signal and transmit messages.

Why semaphoric? From the obvious — billboards, traffic lights, spam ads, trademarks, to the less obvious —  maps, metaphors, hip-hop artists, a peacock’s plumes, signs are all around us. We make and utilize signs to interact with the world, and in turn, signs influence how we see and understand the world.

semaphoric examines signs of culture and faith and considers how both influence the way we understand ourselves, shape our theology, and how we perceive the world. For the most part, semaphoric is like any blog with its contents reflecting the thoughts and musings of its author.

Who is semaphoric? Entirely conceived by me and one else. I hope you enjoy the great-taste-and-no-filling flavor of semaphoric!

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