Trends

The ghost twitterer

There is still much to be said about the ubiquity of the Internet. With Twitter, there’s no escaping being attached 24-7 to the Web. I recently started twittering and am still trying to figure out the best way to exploit this phenomenon. For the time being, I’ve used it mostly to promote my new blog, that which you are reading right now. Social networking, it seems, is used more for shameless self-promotion and self-aggrandizement than anything else. Celebrities too are getting in on the action. If you’re a celebrity, you can hire someone to “ghost tweet” your Twitter. Writers have been doing this for years, collaborating with famous people to write their books or biographies.

I fancy when I become famous, I would still Twitter my own 140-character status with my own hands. And should I somehow break my collarbone in a horrific Tour de France crash, I’ll Tweet with my uninjured hand so all my adoring fans will know “I’m still alive!” What can I say, I love my fans.

But if you still would like to ghost tweet for me, I’m taking your applications.


Rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated

There’s an alarming story floating around the blogsphere for the past week about the death of evangelicalism. This story first originated on Michael Spencer’s blog and then was picked up by The Christian Science Monitor. Spencer’s predictions are dire and portentous. Simply put, evangelicalism, as we know it here in the West, is “on the verge… of a major collapse” and will cease to exist within 10 years. This doomsday prediction is partly based on the simple premise that evangelicals are slow to understand, exegete, and adapt to the changing social and cultural landscape and have failed to pass on the fundamentals of Christian faith and spirituality to the next generation. Added to this mix is the encroaching pressure of secularism, and evangelicalism, in Spencer’s view, will not survive such onslaught. In its place, Pentecostal, Catholic, and Orthodox churches will thrive, and Western evangelism would benefit to receive missions from Global South churches. [….]


Introducing Semaphoric

flagSo it begins: this blog was set to launch at the start of 2009 when procrastination took over the better of me. Although this first post dates back to January, it took some three months to get this project off the ground. I’m still putting this blog through its paces — there are a number of content and technical issues being worked out. Instead of having semaphoric launch in entire completeness, I’m planning to fill in the space as the blog progresses. For the most part, semaphoric is off and running.

What is semaphoric? From the Greek word sema for signs, semaphoric simply refers to semaphores, a system of visual signs designed to convey a message. Used primarily on ships and railroads, semaphore is the simplest way to signal and transmit messages.

Why semaphoric? From the obvious — billboards, traffic lights, spam ads, trademarks, to the less obvious —  maps, metaphors, hip-hop artists, a peacock’s plumes, signs are all around us. We make and utilize signs to interact with the world, and in turn, signs influence how we see and understand the world.

semaphoric examines signs of culture and faith and considers how both influence the way we understand ourselves, shape our theology, and how we perceive the world. For the most part, semaphoric is like any blog with its contents reflecting the thoughts and musings of its author.

Who is semaphoric? Entirely conceived by me and one else. I hope you enjoy the great-taste-and-no-filling flavor of semaphoric!

I’ve done my part, and now you can do yours:

  • • Read this blog and comment regularly
  • • Subscribe to this blog via your RSS reader
  • • Tell your friends about semaphoric.org
  • • Tell your friends to tell their friends about semaphoric.org!

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